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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in threat to gardens
Posted by on in Imani

On September 18th, the City Register published the name of the gentleman who purchased 89 Schenectady Avenue, the middle of three lots that comprise Imani I Garden.  His name is Herman Stark and his address is listed as 199 Lee Avenue Suite 308 Brooklyn NY 11211.  He paid $365,000 for this single 20x100 lot.

As far we can tell, the only reason someone would spend $365,000 for a 2,000 square foot lot would be to build a residential building.  Of course building such a structure would entail cutting down one of the tallest and most beautiful weeping willow trees in Brooklyn.  Is this really what the community wants to happen?  Is it really that important that we have more unaffordable housing in a borough already rated as one of the least affordable in the United States?  

Or would we rather have a community garden with a towering willow tree, surrounded by chickens, an aquaponics project, fruit trees and a cob oven?

Let your electeds know your preference.  Scott Stringer, the Comptroller, can be reached at 212-669-2156.  Robert Cornegy the local council member, can be reached at 212-788-7354.  Let them know you'd prefer a willow tree over a housing project!

On September 28th, garden members put up the sign you see in the photo.  We are asking for anyone who knows and cares for Imani Garden to send us an email telling of their experiences there and what they like most about the garden.  We're asking that you send your comments to " This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ".  With your permission, we will publish your responses on this website.

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The weeping willow at Imani I, 87-91 Schenectady Avenue

 

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Posted by on in Imani

We just learned that, in a process still unclear to us, on June 18th, 89 Schenectady Avenue, the middle of three lots that comprise Imani I Garden, was sold to a private investor for the sum of $365,000.  In conducting a difficult referee sale, the community was overlooked and is now paying the price! Let us bring this great error to Comptroller Scott Stringer’s attention. Let him know that Crown Heights is who is suffering most from this dispute.  The other side lots in Imani are owned by the New York Restoration Project.  This sale goes forward on August 3rd.   Imani will be effectively cut into two pieces, and the 60 foot willow pictured above, an icon in Weeksville for a very long time, will be cut down.

 

Please ask Comptroller Scott Stringer to halt the closing.   Scott’s hot line number is 212-669-3916.  Tell him we need time to transfer the lot of NYRP where it should have been from the beginning.  

Also contact Stephanie Zimmerman, Council member Robert Cornegy’s Chief of Staff at 718-919-0740 x 106.  Ask her to have the Council set aside money to reimburse the City for the liens on 89 Schenectady.  

If you want more information about how you can help, send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

We are working on an on-line petition and Facebook page to address this injustice.  Stay tuned for further developments.

 

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Gardeners relaxing under the weeping willow.  It may soon have a lot to cry about!

 

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Ngonda and Ntangou Badila With A Sign They Created

 

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Chickens Hard At Work in Imani Chicken Run

 

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Gardeners harvesting greens in Imani II

 

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Imani II raised beds and water storage tank

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Posted by on in Imani

Since at least the Bloomberg administration, NYC has been aggressivlely trying to paint itself as being "green".  The building codes are now requiring many green features and incentivising builders to add even more.  Builders get additional buildable square feet for adding water storage tanks on site and get tax credits for adding solar panels.  Bloomberg launched the "Million Tree" initialive and much progress has been made towards that goal.  PlanNYC initiated by Bloomberg and recently updated by DeBlasio calls for every NYer to be within a ten minute walk of green space.

Yet when the sustainability agenda collides that of real estate developers, guess who get thrown under the bus?  As you may already know, Imani Garden II at 1680 Pacfic Street, an established community garden with 13 raised beds, water storage system and greenhouse was put on a list along with 18 other gardens sent to developers as sites for "affordable" housing.  

Now we learned that, in a process still unclear to us, on June 18th, 89 Schenectady Avenue, the middle of three lots that comprise Imani I Garden, was sold to a private investor for the sum of $365,000.  In conducting a difficult referee sale, the community was overlooked and is now paying the price! Let us bring this great error to Comptroller Scott Stringer’s attention. Let him know that Crown Heights is who is suffering most from this dispute.  The other side lots in Imani are owned by the New York Restoration Project.  If this sale goes forward on August 3rd, Imani will be effectively cut into two pieces, and the 60 foot willow pictured above, an icon in Weeksville for a very long time, will be cut down.

To allow time for our elected officials to save the tree and the lot, please ask Comptroller Scott Stringer to halt the closing.   Scott’s hot line number is 212-669-3916.  Ask him to stop the sale so that the erroneous liens can be rescinded.  

Also contact Stephanie Zimmerman, Council member Robert Cornegy’s Chief of Staff at 718-919-0740 x 106.  Ask her to have the Council set aside money to reimburse the City for the sale price of 89 Schenectady.  

If you want more information about how you can help, send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

We are working on an on-line petition and Facebook page to address this injustice.  Stay tuned for further developments.

 

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Imani I street view.  Weeping willow now has a lot to cry about!

 

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Imani II raised beds and water storage tank

 

 

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Posted by on in Imani

On a cold February 10th morning about 100 intrepid gardeners gathered on the steps of City Hall to express their outrage.  It seems that Housing Preservation and Development (HPD), the housing arm of New York City, had decided on its own authority to confiscate 17 community gardeners for "affordable housing".  Without any advance warning to the Parks Department that administers community gardens on City land, the affected City Council members or the community boards, on January 14th HPD issued a Request for Proposals asking developers to express interest in developing housing on 181 City-owned lots.  Buried among these 181 lots, among over 1,000 owned by the City, were 17 community gardens.

The response was swift and furious.  Within 24 hours, Antonio Reynoso, a Council Member from Williamsburgh, issued a letter to the mayor asking that all 17 of the gardens be removed from the list.  By the date of the rally, CMs Robert Cornegie, Rosie Mendez and Stephen Levin had also voiced their concern about the manner in which HPD conducted itself.

The question we have to ask ourselves: what role do gardens play in our communities?  Are communities more than just affordable housing?  In fact, the housing being offered by HPD is not even affordable.  Using something called the Area Median Income (AMI), under the RFP terms, only 1/3 of the units need to be affordable, meaning 2/3 of the units won't be affordable.  And HPD's definition of affordable is 80% of the AMI for a family of four.  Given that the AMI (based on regional statistics that include suburban counties) is $88,600, than means that one out of three units must be affordable to a family earning $70,880.  Hello, HPD.  That does not reflect the actual incomes of families in these communities.  These units will be affordable in name only.

Don't let this mindless land grab go unnoticed.  Sign our petition at Stop the land grab.

For more information on this situation, check out New York City Community Garden Coalition website.

Stay tuned for more developments!

 

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Posted by on in Imani

When we discovered that the vacant lot near Imani I was actually owned by the people, we were overjoyed.  We'd been trying to garden at Imani I for several years but due to a large willow tree, the garden got little light.  By contrast, the vacant lot at 1680 Pacific was just a few feet from Imani I and had no trees at all!

We asked the elected officials who represent us if we could garden there and were initially told no because it was under the jurisdiction of Housing Preservation and Development.  But to our surprise, they offered us a license revokable at will, to use the lot for gardening.  

Of course, our mistake was to accept this Faustian bargain, and sure enough just a few short years later, after we had invested over $5,000 in adding planting beds, a water storage tank and a beautiful greenhouse, our 60 plus past or present members are about to be evicted.  Why this lot was given to HPD, and not Parks, is a mystery.  It's a small corner lot just 30 ' x 87 ', across from the Weeksville Houses, down the street from a large Sanitation garage and a block from the LIRR elevated train line.  It's the only garden in a 20 block radius so if you want to garden in the area, we're it.  It's noisy and has been vacant for over 30 years.  If there was ever a house on the site, it was a long time ago, and it's probably been vacant for good reasons.  

But rather than fight City Hall, we took the bait and ran.  

Now, we have no choice but to fight the decision to turn our garden into housing.  After a meeting of garden members last night, we will be producing a video featuring garden members and inviting local elementary schools to come by for a visit.  If you'e like to find out how you can help, send us an email at " This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ".

The deadline for developers to respond to the City's request for proposals is February 19th.  We have up until then to pursuade the City to remove our garden from the list.

Any help would be appreciated.

 

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