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Subscribe to this list via RSS Blog posts tagged in local agriculture
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Posted by on in Imani

Come to the Brooklyn Permaculture Meetup Friday May 20th at 7:00 at the Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue. We'll be talking about Greg Todd's visit to Selva Negra, a permaculture paradise in northern Nicaragua and Andrew's upcoming Permaculture Design Course.

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Posted by on in Imani

I was astonished to find, in the Business Section of all places, a story about cover cropping in the NY Times today.  Just as permaculturists and organic farmers have known for decades, monocrop farmers are now discovering that cover crops increase yield, improve soil health and reduce loss of topsoil.  The article recounts how the Anson family, and Doug Anson in partiucular, attended an unspecified "seminar" (was it a permaculture talk?!?!) about cover cropping and returned home with "his hair on fire".  Sound familiar, those of you who have attended a permaculture talk?  

He insisted that the family plant at least a small percentage of their acreage with a cover crop that fall.  So in part to humor him and in part out of curiousity, his two brothers agreed to let him plant a cover crop on 1,200 acres, a fraction of the 20,000 acres on the "family farm".   Incredibly, as predicted,  yields increased by 20-25 bushels per acre!   And less quantitatively but more satisfyingly, the soil felt better, less sandy more granular and lumpy, the way good soil should feel.  

The article goes on to note that none other Monsanto is now investing in studies to determine if in fact cover cropping actually has the benefits its promoters say it has.

I'll never forget one of the opening observations made by Geoff Lawton when I took his 72 hour permaculture in 2007 (sponsored by Green Phoenix Permaculture).  He stated that America's number one export was not corn, soy or Boeing airliners, but rather top soil.  I've often repeated this quote in gatherings and it never fails to draw astonished looks.

Now it seems that commercial agriculture as reported in the Business Section of Americas newspaper of record, is beginning to feel the heat.  

Will this new awareness trigger a revolution in agricultural practices?  And more interestingly how will Monsanto and other big ag companies figure out how to subvert cover cropping for their own fun and profit?   Let's all pay careful attention over the months and years ahead.

 

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Posted by on in Imani

On Saturday October 17th at 1 PM, Guy D'Angelo, an organic farmer with 20 years experience growing on a 1/4 acre garden in Center Moriches Long Island, will be discussing fall crops and cover cropping at Imani II. Find out what plants you can grow in the fall in this zone and how to prepare your planting beds. Also learn about the advantages of putting a crop on your planting beds that will protect and enhance the soil over the winter. We will provide a demonstration of how to start your crop, how to cultivate and harvest it. Learn how you can extend the growing season even further with hoop houses over your growing beds.


Imani Garden II is located at 1680 Pacific Street in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn. It has 13 raised beds, a 350 gallon water storage tank and a year around polycarbonate greenhouse.


To get there by mass transit, take the A/C or 3/4 trains to Utica Avenue. Walk Utica to Pacific Street and then walk west to Schenectady Avenue. Imani is located at the corner of Schenectady and Pacific Street.

 

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Posted by on in Imani

We just learned that, in a process still unclear to us, on June 18th, 89 Schenectady Avenue, the middle of three lots that comprise Imani I Garden, was sold to a private investor for the sum of $365,000.  In conducting a difficult referee sale, the community was overlooked and is now paying the price! Let us bring this great error to Comptroller Scott Stringer’s attention. Let him know that Crown Heights is who is suffering most from this dispute.  The other side lots in Imani are owned by the New York Restoration Project.  This sale goes forward on August 3rd.   Imani will be effectively cut into two pieces, and the 60 foot willow pictured above, an icon in Weeksville for a very long time, will be cut down.

 

Please ask Comptroller Scott Stringer to halt the closing.   Scott’s hot line number is 212-669-3916.  Tell him we need time to transfer the lot of NYRP where it should have been from the beginning.  

Also contact Stephanie Zimmerman, Council member Robert Cornegy’s Chief of Staff at 718-919-0740 x 106.  Ask her to have the Council set aside money to reimburse the City for the liens on 89 Schenectady.  

If you want more information about how you can help, send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

We are working on an on-line petition and Facebook page to address this injustice.  Stay tuned for further developments.

 

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Gardeners relaxing under the weeping willow.  It may soon have a lot to cry about!

 

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Ngonda and Ntangou Badila With A Sign They Created

 

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Chickens Hard At Work in Imani Chicken Run

 

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Gardeners harvesting greens in Imani II

 

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Imani II raised beds and water storage tank

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Posted by on in Imani

Are you part of the California drought problem?  Every time you buy a bunch of grapes from California, your contributing not only to some grower's bottom line, you're also consuming 24 gallons of California's water.  For details, check out this recent article in the New York Times about the Cali Drought.

Long before Napa and Central Valley become the nation's number one producer of grapes, New York had an established vineyard colony in the Finger Lake region.   While not reaching the levels of fame achieved by Napa, the the Finger Lake region still produces a passable riesling, and the climate is often compared to that of the riesling producing areas of the Rhine valley in Germany.  According to a 2005 study conducted about wine production in New York State, we have 31,000 wine bearing acres in New York and 1,384 farms producing grapes.  

So as the drought bears down, and California's water restrictions start to effect grape prices, you might want to look for a more local source.  We've actually got a nice grape vine growing along the fence at Imani Garden, which will be bearing grapes shortly, that is if Mayor De Blasio doesn't turn the garden into unafforable housing instead.  

IF this upsets, you might consider letting the Mayor know by writing him a letter.  Send us a copy at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .  Every little bit helps.  According to Paula Segal at 596 Acres, the City should be releasing in June the list of developers who've been awarded sites.  Stay tuned to find out if Imani has been awarded to anyone.

In the meanwhile, see you at the local wine bar!

 

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